What’s on my sewing table

Or maybe I should say floor . . . My fabric is kind of all over the place when I work . . .

Anyways, I don’t have a finished project today, but just felt like checking in with some projects that I’m currently working on and fabric that I’m working with.

First up, is this amazing TRIPLE gauze.  Yes, that’s right – not double, but triple.

Triple Gauze Reversible Dots from Miss Matatabi

It came out of the wash like a dreamy fluffy cloud!  It’s basically already quilted.  I love the cozy, yet super lightweight feel.  Oh, and it’s reversible.

Triple Gauze Reversible Dots from Miss Matatabi

This fabric is for my next Miss Matatabi Makers post.  Here’s a little peek of the project in progress.  Can you guess what it is?  I’m using a JUST released pattern.  Look out for the finished project on Miss Matatabi in a week and a half or so.

Well, I bet you’ll have an easier time guessing that THIS is going to be!!  Here’s a hint – it’s for Yuki, and she’s absolutely frozen with anticipation.

Soon to be Elsa dress

Oh, she’s officially OBSESSED with the movie!  And she’s suddenly reeeally into dress up/costumes at her school.  *sigh*  I suppose it was inevitable and there’s no point fighting it now.

Elsa in the making

I made the mistake of showing her the bodice that I was working on and every day since then she’s asked me, “Is my dress done yet!?”  Truth is, I could finish it pretty quickly, but I’m trying to think of something Yuki can do to earn the dress.  Recently, we’ve been feeling like she’s getting pretty spoiled.  We give her lots of things without her having to work for it.  So I’m worried that she doesn’t understand the value of anything.  We started assigning her some chores and we’re trying a sticker chart, so I think I’m going to tell her that she can have her dress when she earns 10 stickers or something like that.

So yeah – an Elsa inspired dress (definitely not going for an exact copy) is on my sewing table right now.

And this lovely stack of fabrics arrived just yesterday . . .

Kokka Irome

It’s the new line, Irome, from Kokka.  I’m still in the brainstorming phase for these fabrics, though I have a couple of ideas.  What would you make with a stack of colorful fat quarters?

And what’s on your sewing table?

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A Floral Baby Dress and a tutorial

Today I’m sharing a tutorial on the Oliver + S blog on how to alter a shirt pattern with sleeves to a sleeveless shirt!  I modified the Lullaby Layette Shirt pattern for the tutorial, but you can use this method for pretty much any pattern.

Floral Lullaby Layette Dress by you & mie

Floral Lullaby Layette Dress by you & mie

Head over to Oliver + S to check out the full tutorial!

Floral Lullaby Layette Dress by you & mie

I made the Lullaby Layette Shirt pattern (View B in the 3-6 month size), but I made a few modifications.  Besides making it sleeveless, I decided to add a little gathered skirt.  It was actually supposed to be more of a peplum top, but I made the skirt so long that it became a dress!  But that’s ok, I think this will actually fit her for awhile!

Floral Lullaby Layette Dress by you & mie

Before adding the skirt, I shortened the bodice by a couple of inches and also took the sides in a bit, so it was less A-line.  I was too nervous to add snaps to this amazing fabric (the chances of me messing up and tearing a hole in the fabric was too high), plus there’s something so sweet and more vintage-y about buttons, so I went with these light blue ones.  I think I made the right call.

Floral Lullaby Layette Dress by you & mie

This fabric!  It was a gift from my good friend, Frances, AKA Miss Matatabi.  It’s a nani IRO double gauze and it says “Fuwari Fuwari” on the selvage, but I didn’t recognize it, so I knew it must be older than a couple years.  Well after I cut into it I asked Frances about it and it turns out it’s a super rare print from 2006!  VINTAGE NANI IRO (yes, 2006 is vintage when it comes to a fabric line).  I suddenly felt mortified that I had just cut into it!

Floral Lullaby Layette Dress by you & mie

But Frances said that it was probably a good thing that I was able to use the fabric without the pressure of having to create something “worthy,” and I think she’s right.  This fabric probably would have sat in my stash forever and ever, and at least this way it was used to make something special for my daughter and maybe someday it’ll get passed on or something.  Random question – do you save your handmades?  When they are outgrown, do you give them away?  Store them?  Toss them?

Floral Lullaby Layette Dress by you & mie

In other news, Kaya is getting harder and harder to photograph.  That window of time when she could sit up, but not move has been too brief.  She’s already getting ready to crawl and I can barely get her to sit still for a few seconds.  Oh boy!

Anyways, I’d love it if you headed over to the Oliver + S blog to check out my tutorial.  It’s my first time posting over there!  :)

Happy Monday!

 

Panda Raglan Tee {tutorial}

Yes!  I did it!  I finally made something for Yuki that she really likes!

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

I have to admit, I’m pretty psyched about this project.  A couple of months ago I saw a little toddler wearing a tunic that was similar and definitely had an “I can make that!” moment.  Well the idea has been rolling around in my head since then and I just needed the time to do it.  Isn’t that what KCW is all about!?

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

The theme for this Kid’s Clothes Week is “Mini Me” so I decided to make one for little sister as well.  Yuki loved that she and Kaya had matching shirts!  Unfortunately, Kaya wasn’t really feeling the photo shoot.  But I have a feeling she really loves the shirt too :P

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Yuki says, “Can you see my panda ears?”  The 3D ears are definitely the most fun feature of these shirts.  And though these are pandas, you can really make this shirt into almost any animal!  Want to make one for your favorite animal lover?  I made a tutorial!

Here’s what you’ll need:

  •  a raglan t-shirt pattern (I used the Oliver + S Field Trip Raglan T-shirt Pattern, but you can use any, or draft your own)
  • knit fabric (refer to your pattern for amounts) and coordinating thread
  • scraps of fabric for the ears (knit or woven)
  • freezer paper
  • precision knife/scissors
  • iron
  • fabric paint and brush (be sure to read all the directions on your fabric paint before you begin your project)

To get started, cut out all your shirt pieces as your pattern directs (shirt front, back, two sleeves and a neckband).  Lay out the front shirt piece and place your freezer paper on top, shiny side down.  Sketch your animal face.

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Make a pattern piece for the ears.  We will add a small pleat to the ear, so add a little width to the base and also 1/4 around for seam allowance.

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Carefully cut out your stencil, making sure to keep any small pieces you need to place on the inside of your stencil, like the eyes.

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Place your stencil where you want on the shirt (shiny side down) and iron it on using a high heat setting.  Be sure to press well especially around the edges of the design.

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Put your fabric on cardboard or paper, in case the paint seeps through.  Apply the fabric paint in a thin and even coat.  Try not to paint towards the edges of the stencil to avoid sweeping paint under the stencil.  Wait till the paint is mostly dry (30 minutes) and apply another thin and even coat.

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Allow the paint to dry completely before peeling off the stencil.

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

What a fun (and slightly nerve wracking) moment :)

Now for the sewing part.  Cut out 4 ear pieces.

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Place two ear pieces right sides together and pin.  Repeat for other pair.

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Sew along the curved edges with a 1/4 inch seam allowance.  Leave the bottom open.  Trim the curved edge to 1/8 inch.

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Turn right side out and press.  Add a small pleat to the center of the ear (the two ears should have pleats going the opposite direction).  Pin and sew pleat in place.

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Trim the bottom edge so it is straight again.

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Figure out where you want your ear on the shirt front and align the raw edges, right sides together.  Pin and baste the ear in place 1/8 inch from the edge).

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Now we will attach the sleeve to the shirt front.  Align the raw edges of the shirt front and the sleeve front, right sides together.  The ear should be sandwiched in between.  Pin and sew according to the pattern directions.

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Finish edge if desired.  Press the seam allowance towards the shirt and the ear pointing “up” towards the sleeve.  On the right side of the shirt, top stitch the ear to the sleeve close to the seam.

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Repeat on the other side with the second ear.

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Now finish the shirt as directed in your pattern and voila!  An awesome panda shirt for your little one!

Panda Raglan Tee Tutorial by you & mie

Trust me, I reeeeeally think they’ll like it!

Now I’d seriously love to see what other animals you guys can make into shirts!!  If you use this tutorial to make a fun animal shirt, please let me know!  You can add a picture to the you & mie flickr group or just leave me a comment or email me.  I imagine a whole zoo of fun animal shirts :)

It was so great to just make something fun, not for a specific project.  Thanks for the motivation Kid’s Clothes Week!  Hope you’ve been able to make something fun too!

Neon Dot Skirt

Neon Dot Skirt by you & mie

Hey!  It’s Kids Clothes Week!  No long lists over here this time.  Just working on two things.  First one was to finish up this skirt I started a week or two ago.  I was going to make this springy skirt for a specific project and had the fabric cut out and everything before deciding to scrap it.  Well, not scrap the skirt entirely, but just not for that specific project.  But I couldn’t let this gorgeous fabric go to waste!  So I finished up this double layered skirt and it was a pretty quick project.

Neon Dot Skirt by you & mie

The main fabric is Nani Iro Colorful Pocho – neon on dark green, but I’m not sure that you’ll find it available anymore.  I remember snatching it up from Miss Matatabi immediately after seeing it and then, well, hoarding it for the last year and a half.  It is a soft and lightweight double gauze and as dreamy as Nani Iro double gauze always is.

The bottom layer is a chartreuse cotton voile from Michael Levine.  It’s very lightweight and a bit sheer, making it perfect for layering.

Neon Dot Skirt by you & mie

I basically used this Double Layer Simple Skirt tutorial except I added a separate waistband with two casings for elastic.  It also has pockets which is really a deal breaker these days for Yuki.

Neon Dot Skirt by you & mie

Yuki has always said she loves this fabric – she would pick it out from my shelves and ask me to make her something, but I could never figure out what to make.  I thought she would love this skirt, but she is a little unsure.  Part of me is sad that I used up this long hoarded fabric on something that she may or may not wear.  But I also feel like this neon trend (which I’ve fallen for) is not going to last forever, so I might as well go for it while it’s still hot.

What are you working on this week?

 

Miss Matatabi Makers and a Big Bow Washi Dress

It’s no secret that Miss Matatabi is one of my favorite online sources for fabric, especially Japanese fabrics like Nani Iro.  Frances always has an amazing selection of high quality fabrics and she’s a total sweetheart on top of all that.  So I am really excited to announce that I get to be one of the regular contributors on her site, sewing up a new project every month with some fabulous fabric from her shop, along with 3 suuuper awesome ladies!

We’re the Miss Matatabi Makers and you can read all about us here.

MissMatatabiMakers

Starry Night Washi Dress by you & mie

My first project as an official MM Maker is up on the blog now!

I made a big bow Washi Dress in some gorgeous voile AND it has a secret modification to make it nursing-friendly!  Head over to Miss Matatabi for the full post with all the details and how I nearly ruined the whole dress with an accidental serger slice!

And while you’re over there, be sure to check out the other recent posts from Leslie, Angela, and An.  So much fun inspiration and gorgeous fabric!

Happy Monday :)

Straight Lines and Angles Skirt

Straight Lines and Angles Skirt by you & mie

Today I am part of the Straight Lines and Angles series hosted by Jess of If Only They Would Nap.  The series is inspired by the geometric shapes trend, which I have totally fallen for.

I had originally planned on a triangle print skirt, but ended up setting that idea aside and taking a different approach to the project.  Instead of making something with geometric shapes on it, I decided to make something out of geometric shapes.

Straight Lines and Angles Skirt by you & mie

I was inspired by this awesome hoodie, and decided to use straight lines and angles to piece together a skirt with pockets.  I figured it was the perfect opportunity to do some color blocking as well, because that’s always appropriate, right!?

Straight Lines and Angles Skirt by you & mie

So this is kind of like a basic rectangular skirt (tutorial here), but I cut the pattern into polygons to create the angled center piece and pockets.  Here are my pattern pieces . . .

Straight Lines and Angles Skirt by you & mie

Doesn’t get more “straight lines and angles” than that, huh?

Straight Lines and Angles Skirt by you & mie

As a finishing touch, I freezer paper stenciled a set of stars (my favorite of all polygons) in one corner.  I love stars so much.

Straight Lines and Angles Skirt by you & mie

I’ve also been having fun coming up with different and unexpected combinations of colors.  Since I’m trying to use fabric from my stash, I dug all of these up from my scrap pile.  Recognize any of them?  The center panel is a gorgeous purpley shot cotton from the Maggie Mae Tunic.  The chartreuse is from my Project Run and Play Sew-along Signature Look skinny pants.  The side panels of the skirt are a cream linen/linen blend that I used for the Art Museum Vest.  The waist band is an oatmeal colored linen, but I have no idea where it came from or what I used it for before.

Straight Lines and Angles Skirt by you & mie

When I first showed Yuki the skirt, she said she didn’t like it, or the tank top I wanted her to wear with it.  Then she suddenly changed her mind and put them on happily and wore them the rest of the day!  That was a nice surprise – I feel like I haven’t made her anything she’s actually liked in a long time.  And hey!  I like it, too!  Isn’t it nice when things work out like that?

Follow along the rest of the series here and be sure to enter the Straight Lines and Angles giveaway here!

Have a great week!

Adding Ruffle Sleeves {tutorial}

Ruffle Sleeve Tutorial by you & mie

Last week I shared my daughter’s new baby bodysuit from the Oliver + S Lullaby Layette pattern set and one of the biggest modifications I made to the pattern was adding ruffle sleeves.  Ruffle sleeves are a fun and feminine touch for any spring or summer top or dress.  Super sweet especially on little ones.

When I was trying to figure out how to attach the sleeves, I looked for a tutorial online, but couldn’t find what I was looking for.  I’ve attached ruffle sleeves or flutter sleeves when there was a bodice lining (like in the Geranium pattern), but there was no lining for the body suit.  I wanted the ruffle to only cover the top of the arm hole, so I knew I’d need a way to finish the rest of the arm hole with bias tape.  Took me awhile to figure out, but it’s so simple, I wonder why I never knew how to do this in the first place!

Ruffle Sleeve Tutorial by you & mie

So some of you might think, “duh, Cherie!”  But hey, if I wanted a tutorial like this to be out there in blogland, there must be others needing the same thing, right?!  So anyways, here’s the tutorial on how to add ruffle sleeves to any unlined bodice pattern.

If you are starting with a pattern that is meant to have sleeves, the first step is to reduce the width of the shoulder.  You can either do this to the pattern before you cut your fabric, or you can do it after.  I didn’t remember to do it until after I had cut the fabric and sewed the shoulder seams together.  Not a problem.

Ruffle Sleeve Tutorial by you & mie

Trim off from the outer edge of the shoulder seam.  The amount is up to you, I trimmed about 1/2 an inch from the shoulder and then gradually curved my line to meet back with the original arm hole.  Your finished arm hole will be folded under 1cm (3/8 in), so take that into consideration when deciding how much to trim off.

If you haven’t already, go ahead and cut your front and back bodice pieces and assemble them as you wish/as directed by your pattern up to the point when they are sewn together at the shoulder seams.  Side seams should not be sewn yet.

Ruffle Sleeve Tutorial by you & mie

Next, cut your ruffle sleeves.  Size will depend on the size of your garment and your preference.  I cut my sleeve to be about 3 times longer than the desired size of my finished ruffle.  For the height, you can make it however long you want the sleeve to be at the shoulder (longest point) plus about an 3/4 of an inch for seam allowance and hemming.  By the way, none of this is very exact, but ruffle sleeves are pretty forgiving like that. :P

Ruffle Sleeve Tutorial by you & mie

To cut these pieces, cut 2 rectangles in your measurements.  Mine were about 2.25 x 13 inches.  Fold the rectangle in half widthwise and starting from the center fold, draw an arc to the corner.  Cut that out and use it to cut your second ruffle sleeve in the same shape.

You will also need to cut two 1″ strips of fabric on the bias.  Measure your armhole and add a couple of inches to that number to determine the length.  My armholes were about 9 inches, so I cut 12 inch long strips that were 1″ wide.

Ruffle Sleeve Tutorial by you & mie

Mark the center of the sleeve along the curved edge.  This will help later with placement.

Finish the straight edge of the sleeve piece.  You can do this in a number of ways.  You can hem it by folding it towards the wrong side a 1/4 inch and pressing, then another 1/4 inch encasing the raw edge and sewing it down.  You can do a zig zag stitch or serge the edge for a rougher, but cute finish like the Geranium flutter sleeve.  I went with something in between by serging the edge and then pressing it under and stitching it down.  It looks finished from the right side and you can see the serged edge from the wrong side.  This will make it easy to distinguish the right and wrong side in the rest of the pictures.

Ruffle Sleeve Tutorial by you & mie

Now to ruffle that sleeve!  Set your machine to widest stitch possible and sew a basting stitch along the curved edge a 1/4 in from the edge.  Do not backstitch at either end and leave a couple inches of thread when clipping.  Carefully pull on one of the threads (either the top or the bottom) to gather the fabric.  Gather the fabric to the length and ruffleness you desire.  Make sure the gathers are distributed evenly.

Ruffle Sleeve Tutorial by you & mie

Pin your gathered sleeve to your bodice, right sides together and raw edges aligned, lining up the center mark on your sleeve with the shoulder seam.  Baste the sleeve on with a 1/4 inch seam allowance.  Repeat with the other sleeve.

Ruffle Sleeve Tutorial by you & mie

Take your bias strip and fold it into thirds and press.  If you want to be really exact, you should fold it in 1/4 in. on one side and 3/8 in. on the other side (the center section will be 3/8 in).  Really though, when we start talking an 1/8 of an inch of a difference, I’m not sure if it matters that much.

Ruffle Sleeve Tutorial by you & mie

Pin your bias tape right side down (facing the wrong side of the ruffle sleeve) along the edge of the armhole.  This should sandwich the sleeve between the bias tape and the bodice pieces.  If you are going with the exact measurements, you want the 3/8 inch fold to be along the edge (right side in this picture).  Stitch along the crease closest to the edge.

Ruffle Sleeve Tutorial by you & mie

Fold the bias away from the bias and press.

Ruffle Sleeve Tutorial by you & mie

Flip the garment wrong side up and fold the bias tape in once, then again towards the wrong side.  The ruffle sleeve should flip out and the raw edge should be encased.  Press carefully and pin.

Ruffle Sleeve Tutorial by you & mie

Sew along the folded edge of the bias tape and trim off excess.  Almost done!

Ruffle Sleeve Tutorial by you & mie

Sew side seams of the bodice, right sides together and finish edges as desired.  Press seam towards the back.  Tack the top of the seam down with a few stitches, if desired.  You can see the tacking in the picture below, though it’s hardly noticeable when being worn.

Ruffle Sleeve Tutorial by you & mie

Finish the rest of the garment as directed in your pattern and you’re done!

Oliver + S Lullaby Layette Summer Bodysuit // by you & mie

Enjoy those little arms in those little ruffles!

*As with all my tutorials, this was written extremely late at night when already sleep deprived, so if something doesn’t quite make sense and you need clarification on any part, please don’t hesitate to ask.  It’s probably my fault, not yours.*

Happy Sewing!  :P

Lullaby Layette Summery Bodysuit

Oliver + S Lullaby Layette Summer Bodysuit // by you & mie

I’m back with another project from the new Oliver + S Lullaby Layette Pattern Set!  This time I made the bodysuit (View A) and went in a totally different direction from the cozy jacket in modern colors.  I really wanted to make something sweet, vintage-inspired and summery for the upcoming months.  Before you ask, no, the ruffle sleeves are not part of the pattern, BUT I have a tutorial for those coming up next week!  They are really quite simple and can be added to pretty much any bodice pattern.

Oliver + S Lullaby Layette Summer Bodysuit // by you & mie

But back to this sweet number . . . the bodysuit features a snap placket at the neckline and also at the bottom for easy diaper changes.  It has a cute pleat in the front and back and elasticized leg openings.

Oliver + S Lullaby Layette Summer Bodysuit // by you & mie

The bodysuit is really cute alone because it is quite roomy at the bottom.  But you can easily pull pants over it as well and let the extra fabric hang over the pants like a top.  Or, if you prefer it, this same pattern can be made as a top.  And it has short and long sleeve options.  Before I made this bodysuit, I actually made the shirt version (View B), but because of a poor fabric choice on my part, it didn’t come out that great.  More on that later . . .

I don’t think I really need to say much about the quality of the pattern, do I?  You all already know how awesome Oliver + S patterns are, right?  Ok, good.  I’ll just leave it at that.

Oliver + S Lullaby Layette Summer Bodysuit // by you & mie

Besides the ruffle sleeves that I added, there were a few other changes I made.  Remember how I mentioned I had some difficulty attaching the snaps to the jacket?  Well, this pattern called for snaps at the neck and bottom and while it would have been totally doable, I wanted to test out some other options for those who prefer to avoid snaps.

Oliver + S Lullaby Layette Summer Bodysuit // by you & mie

For the front closure, I decided to add buttons instead of snaps.  My machine makes pretty neat buttonholes, so this was an easy option for me.  Another option, which I tried for the first shirt I made, was to simply sew the bottom portion of the placket closed.  I wanted to leave enough room for baby’s head to fit through, but not leave the shirt hanging wide open.  So I measured how far up the placket I should sew shut (by testing it on my baby) and left just a few inches open at the top.  Easy to do and easy to put on – nothing to open or close!

Oliver + S Lullaby Layette Summer Bodysuit // by you & mie

 

For the bottom of the bodysuit, snaps are really a must.  So I sewed on a strip of this twill tape that already has snaps attached to it.  You can find it at most fabric stores – I bought mine at Jo-Ann.  If I remember correctly, it’s a bit expensive, but definitely comes in handy when you don’t want to attach your own snaps.  I also think it was a good choice for this particular fabric, which even with interfacing, is very thin and delicate.

Oliver + S Lullaby Layette Summer Bodysuit // by you & mie

 

The fabric is a very lightweight swiss dot cotton that I bought at Discount Fabrics.  I originally bought it to make myself a Staple Dress, which I almost finished, but abandoned because I didn’t think it was very flattering on me.  I found the unfinished dress recently and I think with a few modifications, it might work, so maybe I’ll try and work on that for the spring.  But I had enough left in my stash for this little number.  And I think it’s perfect!

The fabric is so thin that it is a little sheer.  Perfect for hot weather and appropriate for babies, since they don’t really have to worry much about modesty.  Because it’s so thin, it’s very comfortable.  The problem with the first shirt that I made was that I had used a quilting cotton that was a bit too stiff for a baby’s shirt.  I would recommend sticking with lightweight fabrics and knits, especially for the wee littlest ones.  I also chose a crazy print that ended up looking kind of like a miniature bad Hawaiian shirt.  :P

Oliver + S Lullaby Layette Summer Bodysuit // by you & mie

 

This is pretty much how Kaya felt about the photo shoot.

The only thing I would do differently next time is add a little length to the elastic for the leg openings.  It’s hugging Kaya’s chubby thigh already and otherwise she’d be able to fit into this for awhile.  And she’s not even a particularly chubby baby!  Oh, I made the 3-6 mo. size again and it’s perfect.

Oh, I can’t wait to hit the beach and park with this cutie in her new bodysuit!  And us lucky ducks in California don’t really have to wait any longer.  Today was gorgeous and in the mid-70s!

Ok, so next week I’ll have the tutorial for the ruffle sleeve, so look out for that!  And until then, have you seen the other two new Oliver + S patterns?  There’s the Garden Party Dress + Blouse which three of my bloggy buddies all made – check out Kristin’s, Gail’s and Jessica’s.  And then, my favorite of the new patterns, is the Hide-and-Seek Dress + Tunic.  Can’t wait to sew that one up!  What’s your favorite?

*This pattern was generously given to me for this review, but all opinions are, as always, 100% my own.*

Lullaby Layette Baby Jacket

Oliver + S Lullaby Layette Jacket // by you & mie

Did you hear?  The new Oliver + S spring patterns have been released!  There are two adorable spring dresses/tops, and a baby/toddler layette pattern set.  I’m so excited to help roll out these patterns by sharing a couple of things I made.  I looove the dresses, but was eager to give the Lullaby Layette patterns a try first.  The set comes with 4 views – a bodysuit, a shirt, pants and a jacket and covers sizes 0-24 months.

Oliver + S Lullaby Layette Jacket // by you & mie

The first thing I made was the raglan style, reversible jacket (View D).  I’m always looking for cute outerwear for Kaya.  She’s got plenty of onesies, but it can get chilly in all seasons around here, so a jacket is always a must.  The pattern calls for wovens, but says knits can be used too.  So I definitely wanted to give the knits a try – it just seems like it’d be warm and cozy.

I made size 3-6 months for Kaya who is approaching 6 months.  I debated whether I should go with the 6-12 month size for longer wear, but the smaller size still has plenty of room to grow.

Oliver + S Lullaby Layette Jacket // by you & mie

The pattern, as you can expect from all Oliver + S patterns, is wonderful.  I love the glossary of sewing techniques that they include at the beginning of every pattern – you can learn a lot just by reading that part alone!  But then this set includes 3 separate patterns (one that can be made in 2 ways) and each has well written directions with great diagrams.  You always get really professional quality clothes when you use O+S patterns and you learn a ton of great sewing skills.

The construction of this jacket is pretty simple and it comes together quickly.  It is raglan style, with a simple pleat in the shoulder.  You make the jacket and the lining in the exact same way and then attach them together (in a seemingly) seamlessly way that doesn’t require any flipping inside out and hand stitching closed.  The hardest part of the whole process was attaching the snaps.  I had a helluva time with them, until I realized I was doing it wrong.  Once I figured it out it went a little better, but I had one fall off after I thought I was all done.  I used the “Easy Attacher” (affiliate link) which actually helped a lot, but Kristin said that the snap fastener pliers (affiliate link) are even better.

Oliver + S Lullaby Layette Jacket // by you & mie

One of my goals for 2014 was to try use more fabric from my stash, and though I haven’t stopped buying new fabric completely, I am trying to search through what I have before I buy more fabric and notions.  And it’s been fun finding old fabrics and giving them new life when paired with something unexpected.  Both this jacket and the bodysuit that I’ll share later this week were completely made with stuff I already had at home!  Yay me!  :P

Oliver + S Lullaby Layette Jacket // by you & mie

The mustard knit is from Stonemountain and Daughter in Berkeley and I bought it awhile back to make Yuki a cardigan.  I cut it out and everything, but it never got made.  I don’t even know what happened to those pieces, but hopefully I’ll find them again in time for Kaya to wear.  Anyways, there was enough fabric left to cut out this jacket!  It seemed perfect for baby outerwear – a sturdier, thicker knit, but still had some stretch.  Someone on Instagram asked me if it was “ponte,” and I don’t actually know what that is!  But I looked it up online and the description seems to match pretty closely.  Anyone else have a guess?

Oliver + S Lullaby Layette Jacket // by you & mie

The other side is a white/black striped knit that I’ve also had forever and used for the shirt in this outfit.  It’s pretty thin, so it was nice to be able to pair it with the thicker mustard knit.  And the pink bias tape was originally going to be used to bind a baby blanket/quilt that never happened.  I do love this kinda funky and modern combination of colors.

Oliver + S Lullaby Layette Jacket // by you & mie

So now Yuki – eek, Kaya!  I honestly just typed Yuki’s name.  Do you guys mix up your kids names all the time too!?  Anyways, Kaya has a new jacket for this transition into spring.  Oh and yes, spring!  It’s coming, can you feel it!?  Soooo exciting!

I’ll be back with a truly springy/summery bodysuit for Kaya later this week.  What are you sewing for the spring?

*This pattern was generously given to me for this review, but all opinions are, as always, 100% my own.*

More stenciling!

I didn’t realize when I had written my last post that so many people have never done, or even heard of, freezer paper stenciling or potato stamping!  They are both such fun and relatively simple ways to add a unique touch to any fabric – clothes, pillows, napkins, bags, etc.  If you want to find out more about freezer paper stenciling, there are lots of tutorials and examples you can find online, for example, Dana has a pretty in depth tutorial here.  And here’s a basic tutorial on potato stamping on paper, which is basically the same as stamping on fabric – just be sure to use permanent fabric paint and put paper or cardboard under the fabric so the paint doesn’t bleed through to the other side.  Also, be sure to read the directions for whatever fabric paint you use, because some of them need to be treated or set differently.

stenciling workshop // you & mie

Well, the workshop I did with the high schoolers last week went really really well!  I loved sharing the freezer paper stencil technique with them and they all did such a great job getting creative and having fun their projects.  They were so into the stenciling that we never actually got around to stamping!

stenciling workshop // you & mie

It was really fascinating to see how each student approached the project.  Some just dove right in and moved quickly through the process.  Some spent hours on one detailed design.  Others were able to finish several projects in one day.  Some asked lots of questions so they wouldn’t miss a step.  Others tried to figure things out for themselves.  And they all ended up with projects to be proud of.

stenciling workshop // you & mie

A couple of them mentioned that they really enjoyed having the freedom to choose whatever image they wanted and then personalize something with that image.  When you think about where high schoolers are at developmentally and how important expression of identity is, you realize that a project like this can be pretty empowering.

stenciling workshop // you & mie

But really, I’m hoping that they at least had some fun :)  I know I did!

stenciling workshop // you & mie

There were a couple of projects that I finished too.  The first was the cat onesie for Kaya.

Stenciled cat onesie // you & mie

Stenciled cat onesie // you & mie

In hindsight, I could have printed the cat a little higher on the onesie, but otherwise, pretty cute, right?

And I also finished my “Makers Gonna Make” shirt for me using Delia’s free printable . . .

makers gonna make shirt // you & mie

you can see the basic steps of the stenciling process here: 1. draw or trace design onto freezer paper and cut out stencil, 2. iron stencil onto fabric, 3. apply fabric paint, let dry and repeat with second coat of paint, 4. peel off stencil to reveal image and heat set paint, if necessary.

I’m so glad that I tried this technique!  It’s so fun and gives you the ability to create something truly one-of-a-kind.  The possibilities are endless!  I got my freezer paper from here and one roll will last you quite a long time.

Do you freezer paper stencil?  If you haven’t yet, do you think you will try it?